The White Card

This show is open to high school students.

When

Students and families can choose from the following times:

  • Wednesday, February 5, 2020 at 7:30pm

Where

Penumbra Theatre
270 N Kent St
St Paul, MN 55102

About the Show

Virginia and Charles are wealthy, white arts patrons with a keen interest in racial injustice. Over time they have acquired an impressive collection of contemporary art depicting the violence exacted against black Americans. Tonight, they are excited to host Charlotte, a black photographer on the verge of great renown, at a private dinner in their home. As the conversation ventures into our current political climate from the first champagne toast, it’s clear neither artist nor collector is what the other may have expected. With incisive wit, Rankine’s play turns the camera from the casualties to the collectors.

Contains mature themes. Children should be 14 years of age or older to attend this performance. Childcare will be provided for those under the age of 14. Please let us know if you need childcare when you make your reservation.

Transportation

If you do not have access to a ride, call Project Success and we can provide transportation for you. Please let us know if you need a ride when you make your reservation. We will need at least 2 days’ notice to set up transportation.

Reserve Now

Request Tickets Online

or call Project Success at (612) 874-7710

This show is open to high school students.

Invited students can pick up tickets at the Project Success table in the lobby of the theater on the dates of the performances. Please arrive 20 minutes before the show to pick up your tickets. Each student/family may receive up to 4 FREE tickets.

Thank you to Project Success theater partner, Penumbra Theatre, for providing tickets to students at no cost.

Themes

  • Violence against black Americans has been captured in art of many genres and forms. As Nina Simone said, “It is an artist’s duty to reflect the times.” In this play, well-intentioned white art collectors are questioned by a black artist about their choices of art to collect. How does one respectfully navigate the intersections of identity, art, and real life?

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