The Skriker

This show is open to high school students.

When

Students and families can choose from the following times:

  • Friday, February 28, 2020 at 7:30pm
  • Sunday, March 1, 2020 at 2:00pm

Where

Rarig Center – in the Stoll Thrust Theatre
330 21st Ave S
Minneapolis, MN 55455

About the Show

“The Skriker” blends English and Irish folktales with a non-linear structure to tell the story of an ancient fairy pursuing two young women in 20th century London. The Skriker is a stunningly imaginative play about the consequences humans must face when we exploit the natural world.
 
“…The Skriker reclaims what have been thought as “women’s issues” for humanity. Motherhood may, after all, also affect men. Churchill uses a female voice to express a skewed world.” -The Guardian

Contains mature language and themes, including violence against a child. Children should be 14 years of age or older to attend this performance. Childcare will be provided for those under the age of 14. Please let us know if you need childcare when you make your reservation.

Transportation

If you do not have access to a ride, call Project Success and we can provide transportation for you. Please let us know if you need a ride when you make your reservation. We will need at least 2 days’ notice to set up transportation.

Reserve Now

Request Tickets Online

or call Project Success at (612) 874-7710

This show is open to high school students.

Invited students can pick up tickets at the Project Success table in the lobby of the theater on the dates of the performances. Please arrive 20 minutes before the show to pick up your tickets. Each student/family may receive up to 4 FREE tickets.

Thank you to Project Success theater partner, U of M Department of Theatre Arts and Dance, for providing tickets to students at no cost.

Themes

  • Playwright Caryl Churchill tells several stories (some rather dark) in this play, featuring mythological characters from British folktales. In what ways might folktales uniquely address the present challenges in society? Why might an artist use myth to magnify the mundane?

Find the Venue